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History Coming Soon . . .

 

 

 

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   GREEK IONIC  

  • The column height is equal to (9) diameters.

  • Shaft is tapered and usually fluted with (24) flutes, but it can also be plain / smooth.

  • Instead of ending at the top & bottom of the column shaft, the flutes are commonly rounded off.

  • Capitals are most noticeable by volutes (scrolls) - which, in ancient times, mimicked the curls of a woman's hair. Greek Ionic column capital designs have larger volutes (i.e. Erechtheum) than the Roman Ionic counterparts. The capital is topped off with a rectangular abacus.

  • The Ionic (Attic) base is the correct base style to utilize, and it consists of (2) rings - an upper & lower torus that is separated by a scotia (concave molding). Very early Attic bases did not rest on a square plinth, but the Order has evolved to include a square plinth.

  • The entablature consists of (3) sections (top to bottom): the cornice, the frieze, and the architrave.¬† It is recognized as having more ornamentation than both the Tuscan & Doric Orders.

  • The cornice section of the entablature boasts intricate dentil detailing.

  • The Greek Ionic column is correlated to femininity, elegance, and grace.
   ROMAN IONIC   

  • The column height is equal to (9) diameters.

  • Shaft is tapered and usually¬†fluted¬†with¬†(24)¬†flutes, but it can also be plain / smooth.

  • Instead of ending at the top & bottom of the column shaft, the flutes are commonly rounded off.

  • Capitals are most noticeable by volutes (scrolls) - which, in ancient times, mimicked the curls of a woman's hair.¬†Roman Ionic column capital designs have¬†smaller volutes (i.e.¬†Roman Ionic) than the¬†Greek Ionic counterparts. The capital is topped off with a rectangular abacus.

  • The Ionic (Attic) base is the correct base style to utilize, and it consists of (2) rings - an upper & lower (which is slightly larger than the upper) torus that is separated by a¬†scotia¬†(concave molding).¬† They rest on a square plinth.

  • The entablature consists of (3) sections (top to bottom): the¬†cornice, the¬†frieze, and the¬†architrave.¬† It is recognized as having¬†elaborate ornamentations.

  • Garlands are regularly a featured ornamentation in the frieze section of the entablature.

  • The Roman Ionic column is correlated to femininity, wisdom, and beauty.

    classical examples of the orders of architecture header with black background and white pin stripes

    • Erechtheion [Greek Ionic] | (Athens, Greece)
      / view /

    • Temple of¬†Athena Nike [Greek Ionic] | (Athens, Greece)
      / view /

    • Temple of Apollo Epicurius, Bassae [Greek Ionic] | (Ancient, Greece)
      / view /

    • Temple of Portunus [Roman Ionic] | (Rome, Italy)
      / view /

    • Second level of the Colosseum [Roman Ionic] | (Rome, Italy)
      / view /

    • Theatre of Marcellus /¬†Second level [Roman Ionic] | (Rome, Italy)
      / view /

    recommended column uses of the orders of architecture header with black background and white pin stripes

    • For exterior residential front entryways.

    • For Cultural Arts buildings.

    • For second story applications.

    • On upper balconies and decks.

    • For interior & exterior projects that require elegance and sophistication.

    • For university buildings.

    • For judicial buildings.



    BIBLIOGRAPHY


    Brandwein, Martin. ‚ÄúCLASSICAL ARCHITECTURE: A HANDBOOK OF THE TRADITION FOR TODAY.‚ÄĚ Institue of Classical Architecture & Art. Web. Oct.-Nov. 2017.

    Onians, John. Bearers of meaning: The Classical Orders in Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1990.

    Stratton, Arthur. The orders of architecture, Greek, Roman and Renaissance, with selected examples of their application shown on 80 plates. London: Studio Editions, 1986.